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California Department of Parks and Recreation

Transparency, flexibility and mutual trust are key but typically, adjusting to hybrid work is not a one-size-fits-all venture, panelists said at the recent California Public Sector CIO Academy.
Agencies in state government are recruiting for a chief information officer, a deputy CIO, and officers to oversee programs dealing with applications and privacy.
The leadership roles are in the Department of Parks and Recreation, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, the California Department of Public Health and the California Department of Technology.
As part of Industry Insider — California’s ongoing efforts to educate readers on state agencies, their IT plans and initiatives, here’s the latest in our periodic series of interviews with departmental IT leaders.
Both positions are Career Executive Assignments and require experience in managing people and the technology supporting a variety of departmental business functions.
His deep background in state government technology and executive leadership was among the attributes that prompted his new employer to seek him out for his new role as a strategic adviser and business development executive.
In a new request for quotation, the California Department of Parks and Recreation is calling for responses from IT companies capable of helping it automate key processes.
Patrick Dennis told attendees at a recent Techwire Member Briefing that his department is focused on data as a way to operate more efficiently while enhancing public access to the state’s 279 park properties.
Patrick Dennis, a veteran of state IT leadership, has been deputy director and chief information officer for the California Department of Parks and Recreation since 2018. He oversees technology and IT policy for the department, which has an annual budget of about $900 million.
The California Department of Parks and Recreation’s five most expensive purchases of IT goods so far this year landed in the mid-seven figures and included purchases of radios, computers and a records management system.
The future of remote state work is taking shape as departments hammer out permanent policies and Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration negotiates with unions. But how much will workers be monitored at home?
Months in the making, the new contract from the California departments of Technology and Parks and Recreation is expected to give state entities the chance to deploy new connectivity or bolster existing service.
The chief “will serve as an enterprise-wide liaison with management and direct a matrix organization of technical and business subject matter experts to develop and lead engineering efforts for all enterprise IT initiatives,” the job posting says.
Planet Technologies and Microsoft were the vendors for the project, which allowed the state agency to make the transition easily. Lucky timing was also a factor.
The California Department of Technology has issued an Invitation for Bid seeking “fully managed statewide rural broadband connectivity service” for government customers.
The California Department of Parks and Recreation seeks a vendor to offer residents “statewide Wi-Fi ‘pay as you go’ service at pre-determined park locations,” on a 10-year contract.
As part of its ongoing quest to more closely connect readers in gov tech and the technology industry, Techwire heard from Patrick Dennis, chief information officer at the California Department of Parks and Recreation, on his role; the rise of "Statewide Broadband as a Service"; and reaching visitors where they are.
The goal is to have statewide WiFi and broadband connectivity across California's 280 state parks and 22 field districts.