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California Department of Technology

The Aug. 22 event in Sacramento will include government leaders’ forecasts on future initiatives impacting IT across the state, and it’s designed for sales and marketing leaders seeking to “turbocharge business strategies and validate sales and marketing activities.”
The June 6 forum will include an update from the Department of General Services including its procurement needs, as well as discussion of critical services, the Technology Stabilization Program and the Technology Modernization Program.
“This transformative process marks a departure from traditional infrastructure and opens the door to many benefits that will propel the system’s capabilities into the future,” says CalHR Chief Information Officer Enrique Parker.
From new contracting requirements around Internet service providers to cybersecurity metrics, this session has seen a lot of IT-related bills. Have any survived the journey thus far? Yes. Yes, they have.
Five vendors have been tapped to explore possible use cases for generative AI across several agencies and priority areas.
Held at the UC Berkeley Haas Business School, the hackathon hosted 206 on-site and remote participants who collaborated and prototyped solutions to enhance citizen engagement and harness digital innovation for better governance.
From new rules for AI to small-business contracting thresholds, this session has seen a lot of IT-related bills. Have any survived the journey thus far? 
Thousands of miles worth of middle-mile broadband network infrastructure are on track — and even ahead of schedule — the California Department of Technology reports.
Ivy Teng Lei is the state’s first chief digital strategy officer; Renoir “Ren” Pope is the state’s chief enterprise architect; and CDT alum Chaeny Emanavin has returned to the department as the state’s deputy chief technology officer. All will report to state CTO Jonathan Porat.
The California Department of Technology and the Department of Health Care Services have issued requests for quotation and information, respectively.
Office of Data and Innovation CIO Chad Bratton is focused on enabling his team to push beyond the status quo in service of Californians.
“With the evolution of AI and other emerging technologies, it is more important than ever that our workforce remain nimble and prepared for cyber attacks,” said Crystal Holcomb, deputy director of the Office of Professional Development.
The positions are in the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation, the Office of Data and Innovation, and the California Department of Technology.
The California Department of Social Services has a very full plate, with several major IT projects at various stages.
Kevin Lothar Petrik has been selected to lead the Department of Technology’s geographic information systems efforts. He brings experience from the public, private and nonprofit sectors.
With the state staring down the barrel of a multibillion-dollar deficit, lawmakers have been busy looking for solutions. Here’s a look at some of the changes for IT.
“Part of the AIO role is to support and partner with the other departments within the agency,” Robinette told Industry Insider — California. “I want to focus on the innovation part of it. There’s some super-capable CIOs within the agency.”
The Middle-Mile Broadband Initiative will host its advisory committee meeting Friday.
Emanavin, a seasoned government IT leader, has been tapped to serve as the California Department of Technology's deputy chief technology officer.
The California Highway Patrol is seeking a CTO, and the California Department of Technology is recruiting for a GISD data engineering architect.
The roles are cybersecurity compliance officer for the California State Transportation Agency and network security engineer for the California Department of Technology.
The funds, from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021, will be used for affordable Internet service, state-of-the-art devices and digital literacy training. According to the California Department of Technology, “Now the state will pivot from planning to action.”
Thirty-three IT projects totaling more than $3.7 billion are being regularly evaluated by the California Department of Technology’s Office of Statewide Project Delivery. In this series we look at project successes and where they fall short.
Before her tenure with DHCS, Taylor served in various roles in the California Department of Technology, the State Franchise Tax Board and the Legislative Analyst’s Office.
Some of California’s most influential IT leaders — all women, it’s worth noting — shared their takes on what the public and private sectors can do to further diversify the technology workforce.
The California Department of Transportation has spelled out five “challenge” areas, plus a “wild card” category, for which it seeks proposals and solutions from tech vendors.
As part of Industry Insider — California’s ongoing efforts to inform readers about state and local agencies, their IT plans and initiatives, here’s the latest in our periodic series of interviews with IT leaders. Responses have been lightly edited.
Several bills could mean changes to how the state and vendors deploy and develop new tech. Here are just a few of them.
Agencies and their vendor partners now have a set of guidelines to follow when it comes to incidental and intentional generative AI procurements.
State CIO Liana Bailey-Crimmins shared California's IT progress on key initiatives and offered a look at the future during the California Public Sector CIO Academy Monday morning.
The State Water Resources Control Board aims to build a database that integrates a century of water rights records, geospatial mapping and up-to-date water diversion data that’s available to the public.
In a recent virtual Vendor Day, the California Department of Transportation laid out five “challenge” areas, plus a “wild card” category, for which it seeks proposals and solutions from tech vendors.
Monday’s event, presented by the California Department of General Services and the California Department of Technology, will be offered for in-person as well as virtual attendance.
Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposed funding for broadband infrastructure projects and programs faced pushback from the Legislative Analyst’s Office amid a looming budget deficit and the availability of federal funding.
Senate Bill 1179 would create new contracting requirements for state agencies and Internet service providers around affordable Internet service. Trade groups have voiced opposition to the proposal.
The Los Angeles IT Leadership Forum and the California Public Sector CIO Academy are both coming soon. Speakers at both events include the top names in public-sector technology governance and innovation, as well as industry representatives.
The online event on March 5 will pose five areas in which the California Department of Transportation is seeking vendors’ ideas, suggestions and proposals.
“Aligning with the governor’s multi-year cybersecurity roadmap, FI$Cal’s Cal-Secure initiative incorporates people, process and technology to employ cutting-edge solutions that will strengthen the department’s cybersecurity defenses,” writes FI$Cal Director Jennifer Maguire.
The legislation would set mandatory AI safety testing requirements before training or market release and would require that an internal fail-safe be included in all AI systems to trigger an immediate shutdown if issues are detected.
The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration plans to use generative artificial intelligence to advise its approximately 375 call center agents on state tax code. The AI will then inform what they pass on to California business owners asking for tax guidance.
With less than a week remaining to introduce new bills, state lawmakers continue to release proposed legislation scrutinizing artificial intelligence.
State and local technology leaders discuss their organizations’ work and offer best practices for migrating to the cloud.
The tool, called a Benefits Recommender, is among the state IT projects highlighted in the California Department of Technology’s annual report, Realizing the Success of Vision 2023. It was created by the Office of Data and Innovation, part of the California Government Operations Agency.
Facing a looming deadline to introduce proposed laws, state Assembly members and senators continue to release legislation that could impact IT companies and governments alike.
The annual report, published Thursday, offers metric-based summaries of the California Department of Technology’s work in cybersecurity, project delivery, procurement duration, workforce training, and data access and outcomes.
Two solicitations in generative artificial intelligence focus on improving the process of health-care facility inspections and expanding access to health and social services information for residents who speak limited English.
The California Department of Technology has spent more than $28 million so far this fiscal year through Leveraged Procurement Agreements, which allow departments to buy directly from suppliers through existing contracts and agreements.
The California Department of Food and Agriculture’s retiring agency information officer, Rob Peterson, says the position is a complex one that requires a blend of skills.
The California departments of Technology and Transportation have called for responses from vendors to a pre-solicitation for a data governance solution. An actual procurement, if one comes, isn’t expected until late summer.
“For me, it’s a chance to dive deeper into my passion for coaching and mentoring,” Patrick Dennis told Industry Insider — California. “I can’t wait to contribute to the dynamic team at Info-Tech.”
The Legislature is considering bills setting requirements around procurement contracts with Internet service providers, the use of facial recognition technology and electronic signatures, among others.
During the 12-week program, which is mostly remote, participants will also receive classroom instruction and will be paired with an experienced project manager. The program runs from April 29 through July 18.
The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services indicates it intends to seek proposals from bidders capable of providing it with a mobile dispatch system.
Three departments have collaborated on a third opportunity for vendors, seeking ideas for bringing generative artificial intelligence to bear on issues at a state tax entity.
The California Department of Technology had 13 software contracts worth $1 million or more in fiscal year 2023-24. In all, those awards were valued at $48,087,169.
Gov. Gavin Newsom’s proposed 2024-2025 fiscal year state budget would slash the amount of money the California Department of Technology receives from the state General Fund but offers hope for three vital areas of tech spend.
The California Department of Parks and Recreation is recruiting for a chief information officer who will also serve as IT director, and the California Department of Technology is seeking a project director.
As public-sector technologists contemplate how best to use generative artificial intelligence and confront an estimated $68 billion state deficit, lawmakers have released several bills that would create infrastructure, plans and standards for the use of AI.
Three state departments are collaborating on the release of two opportunities for vendors, which seek ideas in applying generative artificial intelligence to solve challenges in the transportation network.
The California Department of Food and Agriculture wants to hear from IT companies to better inform any future procurement.
Dodd’s bill comes as California lawmakers returned to work in Sacramento for the start of an election-year session dominated not only by AI uses and concerns but also by the state’s significant well of budgetary red ink, an estimated $68 billion.
The exact timing isn’t set, but the California Department of General Services expects to release five Request for Innovative Ideas (RFI2) opportunities this month that would focus on needs at three state entities.
Chock-a-block with procurements, IT executives joining and leaving state and local government, and everyone greatly abuzz about artificial intelligence, 2023 was a year to remember in California gov tech. These were its most significant issues.
The California Department of Technology’s five largest transactions for IT goods in November topped $5 million and included products related to modernization and security.
As state and local IT leaders told Industry Insider in its regular One-on-One interview series, they’re continuing to move to the cloud and harden surfaces against bad actors — while taking important steps in AI and in closing the digital divide.
The openings are for project controller overseeing the unemployment department’s EDDNext initiative and for a digital solutions architect to work in the California Department of Technology’s Office of Digital Services.
“I am thrilled to join HiPER, a company that uniquely aligns with my expertise in project management, procurement and governance,” Russ Nichols told Industry Insider — California. “In today’s landscape of budget constraints and soaring expectations, the synergy between my skill set and HiPER’s tools is paramount.”
On behalf of the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, the California Department of Technology seeks a system based in the cloud that can integrate a variety of existing program area apps.
In light of anticipated deficits in the state budget over the next two years, the California Department of Technology is among entities that are looking for ways to economize without affecting their mission.
The event Friday morning will explain how residents and stakeholders may submit comments on the plan, which allows the state to apply for federal funding to expand Internet service.
The positions are in the California Secretary of State’s Office and the California Department of Technology, respectively. Application deadlines for both roles are this month.
In addition to comments from department leaders, previous end-of-year forums have included a year in review and a look ahead to the coming year, followed by a question-and-answer session for those in the industry.
State departments focused on health care, technology, transportation and fire management are recruiting for these key positions.
Funding for technology work in the 2023-2024 fiscal year state budget may offer clues to requests from state entities during the FY 2024-25 state budget cycle.
A new examination of generative artificial intelligence identified significant areas of potential risk in the state use of such tools.
How might California government make use of generative artificial intelligence? Officials suggest several ways that could happen.
In addition to the California Department of Technology, state entities dealing with public-sector retirement, justice and taxes are seeking candidates for key positions in technology.
Approved technology funding in the state’s enacted 2023-2024 fiscal year budget may offer a preview of what we’ll see in January, when Gov. Gavin Newsom releases his proposed FY 2024-25 state budget.
Using a Request for Innovative Ideas, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s tech-focused strategy, the California Department of Technology challenges innovators and entrepreneurs to suggest potential solutions for the state’s high-speed Internet network.
The California Department of Technology and the Department of General Services will hold the event Dec. 14. Several top IT and procurement executives from state government will speak.
The purchases in October totaled $4,341,927 and included primarily licenses and subscriptions for cybersecurity, Microsoft Office tools and an open data portal.
The Employment Development Department paid $30 million in the third quarter of 2023 to the California Department of Technology for data center services. Many agencies and departments in California pay CDT for this through interagency agreements.
Agency Information Officer Rob Peterson of the California Department of Food and Agriculture has served in key leadership roles in the U.S. Air Force, the Defense Department and California state government, as well as in the private sector.
The California Department of Technology is seeking candidates for the newly created role of chief digital strategy officer, and the California Health and Human Services Agency is recruiting for a chief deputy director who will also serve as the agency’s deputy chief data officer.
The California State Payroll System Project is a long-delayed initiative to modernize state government’s payroll process. The State Controller’s Office is seeking an experienced executive to oversee its many elements.
The California Department of Pesticide Regulation wants to hear from vendors who have information, suggestions, best practices and cost estimates for the technical resources needed to configure, deploy and maintain such a system.
Duties of the position, according to the California Department of Technology, include “developing effective strategies for engaging CDT stakeholders, including customers, advocates, lobbyists, vendors, state and local information officers, and other government officials.”
Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed several bills of interest to those in the technology sector, tightening oversight of high-risk automated decision systems and authorizing a pilot of automated cameras targeting speeders in six cities.
This week’s event will feature leading technology executives from California state and local government and education, as well as industry representatives.
Candidates for chief and manager positions are being sought by state entities that focus on health care, transportation and technology.
A dashboard presented by the California Department of General Services shows in detail how various departments in state government buy goods and services under leveraged procurement agreements.
The California Department of Technology spent almost $18 million on its five largest buys of IT goods in September — more than twice the amount spent on corresponding purchases in August.
The Oct. 12 event will feature leading technology executives from California state and local government and education, as well as industry representatives.
Three state government departments — Technology, Child Support Services and Public Health — are recruiting for these key technology leadership positions.
The California Department of Technology’s Office of Technology Services and the California State Transportation Agency’s Office of Traffic Safety are seeking deputy directors.
ITLA is the flagship career development program that the California Department of Technology offers to state and local government technologists.
The California Department of Technology is seeking a specialist to work on the state Information Security Program Audit team. CDT has been faulted by the California State Auditor for its oversight of state agencies’ information security protections.
Panelists at the California Government Innovation Summit explained how the state is working to streamline and simplify its online services in various ways, including making its websites easier to navigate and using plain, simple language in government documents.
Recruitments are being conducted by the Employment Development Department, the California Department of Technology, the California Highway Patrol, the Department of Child Support Services and the California Public Employees’ Retirement System.
The annual awards, bestowed Tuesday at the California Government Innovation Summit in Sacramento, recognize projects and technologies devised and implemented within state government in the past year.
The California Department of Technology’s five largest transactions for IT goods in August topped $7 million and included a cloud subscription, storage arrays and a licensing pact.
Proposed laws that would create a six-city pilot of automated speed cameras and require the state technology department to inventory “high-risk automated decision systems” are among those passed by lawmakers and headed to the governor’s desk.
The California Government Innovation Summit, to be presented Tuesday in Sacramento by Government Technology, is a transformation of the yearly Digital Government Summit.
Under the order, the California Department of Technology, the Office of Data and Innovation and other state agencies must examine the most significant and beneficial ways generative AI can be used by the state within 60 days.
“The state’s IT security workforce must be prepared for unique challenges,” said Crystal Holcomb, deputy director for CDT’s Office of Professional Development. “Our security-focused programs are in high demand, so we’re excited to offer the Cybersecurity Boot Camp for a third year.”
State Chief Information Officer Liana Bailey-Crimmins provided point-by-point rebuttals to the new report by the California State Auditor.
The California Department of Technology has released a request for information from companies that can provide it with a tool to assist its Office of Statewide Project Delivery in estimating and budgeting tech projects.
The California Highway Patrol asked for and received in the state budget funding to continue existing privacy, risk management and cybersecurity initiatives, and to roll out body-worn cameras statewide.
The California Department of Technology is continuing its recruitment for the key, longstanding executive staff position.
Returned from their summer recess, legislators have less than a month to pass or hold proposed legislation concerning the California Interagency AI Working Group, cybersecurity and data from law enforcement body-worn cameras.
“The Cloud Smart strategy will improve return on investments, enhance security, prepare the state workforce for success, and offer higher quality services to residents,” writes Deputy State CIO Jared Johnson, chief deputy director of the California Department of Technology.
The positions are with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and the California Department of Technology.
As part of Industry Insider — California’s ongoing efforts to inform readers about state agencies, their IT plans and initiatives, here’s the latest in our periodic series of interviews with departmental IT leaders.
The site offers a breakdown of the four core areas of the California Department of Technology as well as links to the state IT strategic plan and a directory of department and agency chief information officers.
The positions in recruitment include cybersecurity and fraud architect, procurement and contracts manager, and manager of communications and applications.
The specialist “plays a key role in leading the development of standards, guidelines, best practices, tools and training that will help government deliver products, information and services that are usable and accessible for all Californians,” the job posting says.
Other departments seeking management candidates include the California Department of Technology and the California State Lottery.
The California departments of Human Resources and Tax and Fee Administration received millions in funding with the approval of the 2023-2024 Fiscal Year state budget to continue vital IT initiatives.
The California Department of Food and Agriculture is planning a multiyear, multimillion-dollar replacement of its Emerging Threats information management system, and it wants vendors’ feedback on a pre-solicitation package.
Members of the Middle-Mile Advisory Committee learned recently that state efforts to increase the availability of high-speed Internet have received additional federal funding, and construction should get underway this year in several counties.
The State of Technology: California Industry Forum on Thursday will offer attendees a variety of perspectives from technology leaders across state government.
Elected officials in the state Senate and Assembly will consider several pieces of cybersecurity legislation when they return from summer recess in August.
The virtual Emerging IT Leaders Boot Camp is a virtual statewide program designed for entry-level IT supervisors, managers and other leaders in the public sector. Twenty students will be accepted for the next course, which runs from Aug. 14 to Sept. 8.
The California Department of Technology’s portion of the state’s new enacted budget contains funding for several technology initiatives that had been sought by budget change proposals.
The openings include state chief enterprise architect, senior adviser and specialty architect.
“California’s Digital Strategy showcases how CDT is taking the lead in government technology by prioritizing resident-focused digital services now and in the future,” writes Jonathan Porat, the state’s chief technology officer as of June.
The California Department of Technology has made more than 200 purchases of IT goods so far this year and spent in the mid eight figures on its five top buys, which included spend in the area of government community cloud.
As part of Industry Insider — California’s ongoing efforts to educate readers on state agencies, their IT plans and initiatives, here’s the latest in our periodic series of interviews with departmental IT leaders.
“I am delighted to congratulate Jonathan on his recent appointment as state chief technology officer,” state Chief Information Officer and CDT Director Liana Bailey-Crimmins told Industry Insider — California.
California’s new $310.8 billion state budget, signed Tuesday by Gov. Gavin Newsom, remains to be refined this summer in budget trailer bills — but already includes many millions for IT work in broadband, child welfare and education.
The California Department of State Hospitals, which operates several facilities around the state that are focused on mental health, is seeking an electronic health record solution capable of replacing some legacy systems and integrating with others.
Candidates are sought for positions including chief, analyst, information security specialist, IT procurement specialist and manager.
Bills still under consideration by the Legislature would bring changes to everything from cybersecurity education to government websites and email addresses.
Four state departments are seeking to fill several key roles, including chief technology innovation officer, assistant deputy director, section chief and office manager.
The state published the 2023-2024 Budget Act earlier this week and, if approved by lawmakers, it will fund IT projects at the Department of Social Services, the Department of Motor Vehicles and other state entities.
The California Department of Tax and Fee Administration, the Department of Technology and the Office of Data and Innovation will host an IT virtual open house later this week.
The California departments of Technology and Tax and Fee Administration have released a multiphase solicitation that seeks a “scalable and reliable tax return analysis solution with data analytics.”
As director of procurement for the Sacramento-based Weideman Group, Daniel Kim will focus on “how we can improve government with the help of business.”
The California Department of Technology is looking to renew a subscription or membership to a key piece of its security portfolio.
The state IT department, the public utilities commission and the Monterey Bay Economic Partnership are all involved in an effort to gather feedback on development of the State Digital Equity Plan and the Broadband Equity, Access and Deployment five-year plan.
Recruiters from multiple state entities will participate in the event, which will include various breakout sessions offering information about the state hiring process and “day-to-day insight” on IT careers.
The funding sought would enable the California departments of Public Health and Social Services to move ahead with significant technology work with the potential for statewide impact.
Recent finance letters documenting changes to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s 2023-2024 Fiscal Year proposed state budget also contain information on tech work underway at entities including the California Department of Motor Vehicles.
Candidates for the role in the California Department of Technology should have knowledge of data networking routing, switching, firewalls, load balancing, intrusion detection systems and intrusion prevention systems.
“We brought Vaishali on board because she has a reputation of being the best in the industry,” said Joe Gaitley, Cribl’s senior director of sales for the western U.S. and Canada. “She has a track record of successfully building SLED territories by focusing on delivering value for her customers.”
Two budget change proposals from the California Department of Technology seek several million dollars to assess issues around statewide broadband deployment and to migrate financial processes to a more modern solution.
Gov. Gavin Newsom released his revised proposed state budget Friday for the 2023-2024 Fiscal Year starting July 1. It’s larger than his proposed January budget, with more funding for the California Department of Technology — but the estimated budget shortfall is larger, too.
“We are excited to bring back this academy for its sixth year and meet the needs of our evolving public-sector workforce by offering most of it remotely,” said Crystal Holcomb, deputy director of the Office of Professional Development.
“The California Climate Action website is an example of the power of collaboration, innovation and user-focused design to create a transformative platform,” writes Blaine Wasylkiw, the state’s deputy chief technology innovation officer.
Lawmakers could place bills that would bring artificial intelligence to bear on research and stand up a cybersecurity council, and others, in suspense next week.